Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Protect yourself with the latest weapon against GMOs—smartphone technology

Consumers will soon have the power to conduct on the spot tests for a variety of poisons in their food -- including GMOs, nanoparticals, pesticides and bacteria. Using smartphone technology, along with a specialized cradle and app, researchers have developed a biosensor that identifies various toxins, bacteria, viruses, proteins and other molecules in mere seconds. With the pervasiveness of GMOs and other dangerous elements infiltrating our food supply at every turn, using modern technology to add another layer of protection against these hazards is a smart move.

As unbelievable as it may seem, the average person contends with an astounding amount of environmental pollutants on a daily basis. Prevent Disease drives the point home in the article, "Consumers Will Soon Have Devices In Their Hands To Detect GMO and Toxic Foods":

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Argan—The miracle beauty oil that also tames heart disease, diabetes and arthritis

Argan oil. It's all the rage among those who treasure flawless skin and glossy hair. But the advantages of the oil aren't just skin deep -- numerous health benefits have also been discovered within the scientific community. Rich in essential fatty acids and antioxidants, argan oil just may be a one stop beauty and health remedy rolled into one.

Extracted by hand from the fruit of the argan tree which grows in Morocco, the oil counteracts dry skin, heals acne and helps fight the signs of aging. The secret? Potent antioxidants protect against free radicals and sun damage, while both oleic and linoleic acid support healthy sebum levels and cellular turnover -- important factors for those contending with acne, eczema or psoriasis. Considered a "dry oil," argan is absorbed readily into the skin, thereby assisting with moisture retention without feeling greasy or clogging pores. Sterolins in the oil also improve skin metabolism and reduce inflammation.

Monday, September 15, 2014

Luci inflatable solar lantern: eco-friendly, zero emissions and affordable—what more can you ask for?

(The Grommet) Luci is an inflatable, affordable, solar lantern that generates continuous light with zero emissions anywhere on earth independent of the grid; it can be charged under direct sunlight or cloudy skies (as well as incandescent light).

As easy to use as it is to deflate and stow, Luci’s durable, waterproof design makes it ideal for everything from boating and camping to outdoor entertaining, and power outages. In fact, lack of electricity was the inspiration for the idea. MPOWERD was co-founded by Jacques-Philippe Piverger, John Salzinger and Jason Alan Snyder. Principal inventor Jason Alan Snyder worked hand in hand with John Salzinger to develop the Luci lantern after an earthquake in 2010 left thousands without power in Haiti. Now, MPOWERD is on a mission to illuminate the lives of people who live in energy poverty all over the world.

Friday, September 12, 2014

Incidence of gluten sensitivity skyrocketing in the U.S. — Are GMOs to blame?

Gluten intolerance has reached epidemic proportions -- a staggering 40 percent of the U.S. population now suffers from it in one form or another. Celiac disease alone strikes one in every 133 Americans. Taking into account the fact that gluten sensitivity has risen sharply over the last 20 years, researchers and food safety advocates are looking at the role GMOs play in this this dramatic spike.

The dynamics of food intolerance

When a person has a sensitivity, the body believes the ingested food is an 'invader' and embarks on a mission to destroy the irritating substance. Unfortunately, the microvilli in the small intestine are harmed in the attack and leaky gut syndrome develops. Because of this damage, the gut wall becomes overly permeable and molecules of food are inappropriately digested. These molecules then leach into the bloodstream and the body responds with inflammation. Food sensitivities and malabsorption issues soon follow. This sets the stage for a spectrum of disease from autism to irritable bowel syndrome to cancer.

Thursday, September 11, 2014

Eight unique ways to use honey beyond the kitchen

As a healing and nutrient-dense food, many of us are familiar with the benefits of raw honey. But did you know that honey can be used in a variety of ways outside the kitchen?

If we only use honey for its sweet taste and glorious texture, we miss out on an entire spectrum of applications. Granted, a batch of local, organic and unpasteurized (raw) honey offers a wealth of nutritional perks, including minerals like iron, calcium, potassium and magnesium -- not to mention easily digestible simple sugars, which can give you a healthy boost when energy lags. Nevertheless, honey is much more than just a delicious food. Have a look at the following eight alternative uses for this "liquid gold."

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Exposed: Wikipedia Holds Bias against Natural Health

In an article by the watchdog group Alliance for Natural Health (ANH), Wikipedia entries for alternative and natural medicine are shown to consistently have severe censorship, misinformation, and vandalism. Since Wikipedia is an extremely popular reference site on the internet with over 16 million articles, this bias towards conventional medicine negatively affects the accessibility of accurate natural health information.

Wikipedia is an on-line international collaboration of volunteers who post, edit, and research a variety of topics. According to Wikipedia's Five Pillars, "articles should strive for a neutrality, cite verifiable, authoritative sources, and honor multiple points of view." Issues arise when solid, referenced information conflicts with another perspective and is edited mercilessly or deleted. Contributors have little or no accountability and can post, edit, or vandalize an entry anonymously or even under a false "expert" alias. This was seen when a prominent Wikipedia contributor was discovered to be a 24-year-old drop out posing as a tenured college professor.