Friday, July 25, 2014

It’s not a fairytale: Seattle to build nation’s first food forest

By Clare Leschin-Hoar

Forget meadows. Seattle's food forest will be filled with edible plants, and everything from pears to herbs will be free for the taking.

(take part) Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Gardasil continues to devastate lives around the world, Obama administration responds by pumping another $1.2 million into HPV vaccine push

"After receiving her second dose of Gardasil ... she could crawl but ... needed to use crutches or a wheel chair ... She experienced problems breathing and had 'super migraines' that never went away ... She had swelling in her face, jaw and wrists. The patient was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre syndrome, myelin sheath degeneration and peripheral neuropathy. Patient was hospitalized twice ... patient has not recovered from symptoms," states a press release by Judicial Watch regarding documents obtained from the FDA's Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Regrettably, this is only one of more than 6,000 registered adverse reactions connected with the vaccine, including over 100 deaths.

Troubled history

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Seeking a low-cost solution to cardiovascular troubles? Hibiscus may be the answer

If you have traveled to Mexico, then chances are that you've seen the vibrant, scarlet-hued herbal tea known as hibiscus. Commonly referred to as "sour drink" in Iran, hibiscus not only is a refreshingly tart brew but also has been used worldwide as an effective medicinal beverage. Rich in vitamin C, alkaloids and bioflavonoids, this bright-red elixir is traditionally used for supporting respiratory and cardiovascular health, lowering blood pressure, maintaining fluid balance and alleviating insomnia. And now, contemporary research has validated the herb as a health-promoting tonic in a variety of areas.

Historical uses, modern applications

Originally grown in Angola, the cultivation of Hibiscus sabdariffa has spread around the world to such subtropical regions as Sudan, China, Egypt, Mexico and Thailand.

Tuesday, July 22, 2014

Is this one daily habit increasing your risk of cancer?

Bearing in mind that skin is the body's largest organ and absorbs substances readily, it's always a good rule of thumb to avoid exposing skin to anything we wouldn't ingest. And yet, a common routine is poisoning us on a daily basis - specifically, chlorinated showers and baths. Used in water treatment facilities to destroy harmful bacteria, viruses and fungi, chlorine is a potent disinfectant. But the darker side of water chlorination is rarely acknowledged, namely, that it causes serious harm to humans in ways which often remain unnoticed until major illness strikes.

Silent poison

A hot, steamy shower or bath is a great way to relax and unwind - or so we thought. In reality, we are exposing ourselves to an array of toxins with significant consequences. We would never suspect that we are bathing in an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) classified pesticide. According to the Global Healing Center post "Chlorine, Cancer, and Heart Disease":

Monday, July 21, 2014

How To Eat For Bright, Beautiful & Clear Skin

(MindBodyGreen) By Dr. Alejandra Carrasco

We're all taught that acne is something that happens to teenagers, but the truth is that many adults struggle with this, too.

And it’s frustrating!

The good news is that dietary changes can make a huge difference in your skin. However, for many, the challenge is committing to a long-term dietary approach before throwing in the towel and taking prescription medicine.

Could you say goodbye to milk, refined sugars, and high glycemic index foods to get clear skin?

The most common culprits in acne are dairy, refined sugar, and high glycemic index foods – basically the foods that make up our Standard American Diet (SAD), according to a recent paper published in Cutis.

Friday, July 18, 2014

Stay cool this summer with natural medicine and herbal remedies

As we enter into the dog days of summer, it's easy to keep cool with specific foods and herbs under our belt. Using the wisdom of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), we can remain balanced, calm and energetic as the mercury rises. Particular suggestions border on simple common sense, others may be more surprising. But one aspect is certain—when the body is comfortable, healthy and at ease, the delights of summer are far more enjoyable.

The fire element, summer and you

Traditional Chinese Medicine views summer as the season of the fire element and heart. States of joy (or lack of it) as well as over excitement are associated with this time of year. The element rules the small intestine while the heart is home to aspects of consciousness like intelligence, memory, creativity, thought and sleep. Excess heat during summertime can aggravate the fire element in the body - causing lethargy, anger and irritability. However, with a measure of care and attention, we need not become imbalanced and hot under the collar. Instead, equilibrium enhancing food and drink are the perfect antidote to rising tempers.