Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Eating by color: Curb cancer risk, encourage emotional stability and support a bright outlook with red hued foods

A simple yet profound approach to exceptional health and balance is found in a diet based on color. Strikingly hued fare brims with phytonutrients, vitamins and minerals. The natural color of food also impacts emotions and world view. Red is associated with our sense of place and security. If you feel disconnected, impatient or ungrounded, you may need more red foods in the diet. Lower back pain, poor digestion, sciatica and immune disorders also indicate a deficiency of these foods as well.

Root of the matter

Eating influences us not only physically but also emotionally. The food we choose at any given moment shapes how we view ourselves and the world, which in turn governs health. If our diet is clean and rich with nutrients, our emotional state tends to be stable and balanced - thereby encouraging a healthy immune system and smooth digestion along with optimum absorption.

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

Live your bliss by boosting brain dopamine levels

If you're blue, can't seem to shed those extra pounds or suffer from malaise, you may be lacking adequate dopamine. As a powerful brain neurotransmitter, dopamine regulates movement, feelings of pleasure, cognitive ability and appetite. When levels are low, zest for life plummets and we become prone to neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's - even schizophrenia. But not to worry. Keeping dopamine flowing freely is easy with a few dietary recommendations.

Food as Medicine

Monday, July 28, 2014

14 Ways to Cleanse the Body from Environmental Toxins

(World Mathaba)
by Christina Sarich

Our blood and bones contain over 85,000 different toxins Our blood and bones contain over 85,000 different toxins
From the chemtrails being sprayed over our neighborhoods to the poisons killing our bees and making our food toxic ‘medicine’ we need a way to purge the deadly elixirs of a greedy government, owned and run by corporate interests. For the sake of keeping your attention, I won’t go on ad nauseum about fluoridated water, oil spills, and contaminated air and water due to fracking and mining.

Friday, July 25, 2014

It’s not a fairytale: Seattle to build nation’s first food forest

By Clare Leschin-Hoar

Forget meadows. Seattle's food forest will be filled with edible plants, and everything from pears to herbs will be free for the taking.

(take part) Seattle’s vision of an urban food oasis is going forward. A seven-acre plot of land in the city’s Beacon Hill neighborhood will be planted with hundreds of different kinds of edibles: walnut and chestnut trees; blueberry and raspberry bushes; fruit trees, including apples and pears; exotics like pineapple, yuzu citrus, guava, persimmons, honeyberries, and lingonberries; herbs; and more. All will be available for public plucking to anyone who wanders into the city’s first food forest.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

Gardasil continues to devastate lives around the world, Obama administration responds by pumping another $1.2 million into HPV vaccine push

"After receiving her second dose of Gardasil ... she could crawl but ... needed to use crutches or a wheel chair ... She experienced problems breathing and had 'super migraines' that never went away ... She had swelling in her face, jaw and wrists. The patient was diagnosed with Guillain-Barre syndrome, myelin sheath degeneration and peripheral neuropathy. Patient was hospitalized twice ... patient has not recovered from symptoms," states a press release by Judicial Watch regarding documents obtained from the FDA's Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS). Regrettably, this is only one of more than 6,000 registered adverse reactions connected with the vaccine, including over 100 deaths.

Troubled history

Wednesday, July 23, 2014

Seeking a low-cost solution to cardiovascular troubles? Hibiscus may be the answer

If you have traveled to Mexico, then chances are that you've seen the vibrant, scarlet-hued herbal tea known as hibiscus. Commonly referred to as "sour drink" in Iran, hibiscus not only is a refreshingly tart brew but also has been used worldwide as an effective medicinal beverage. Rich in vitamin C, alkaloids and bioflavonoids, this bright-red elixir is traditionally used for supporting respiratory and cardiovascular health, lowering blood pressure, maintaining fluid balance and alleviating insomnia. And now, contemporary research has validated the herb as a health-promoting tonic in a variety of areas.

Historical uses, modern applications

Originally grown in Angola, the cultivation of Hibiscus sabdariffa has spread around the world to such subtropical regions as Sudan, China, Egypt, Mexico and Thailand.